Digital Literacy

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Remaining Schedule:
5/21B-Post Test, Intro Education Profile/Plan
5/22A-Intro Final (Workday) Per 3/4 Post Test
5/23B
5/27A-Education Profile/Plan Workday (due)
5/28B
5/29A-Final Workday
6/01B 8th per Work day & PER 1 Presentations DUE!
6/02A-Per 1 Final Presentation (day 1)
6/03B
6/04A-Per 1 (day 2) 3/4/8 (day 1) Final Presentation
6/05B
6/08A-Per 3/4/8 (day 2) Final Presentation
6/09B

June 4th-5th

posted Jun 4, 2015, 12:44 AM by Mike Costello

Final Presentations!

Google Spreadsheet


June 3rd

posted Jun 2, 2015, 11:11 PM by Mike Costello

Per 8
www.typingweb.com 
-15 to 20 min

Video:

June 2nd

posted Jun 1, 2015, 11:53 AM by Mike Costello

Per 1 - Final Presentations

Google Spreadsheet



Per 3 &4
www.typingweb.com 
-20 min

Video:

May 29th-June 1st

posted May 29, 2015, 7:42 AM by Mike Costello   [ updated Jun 1, 2015, 12:23 PM ]

Sign up for Presentations

FINAL workday!!!

Per 1: June 1st
Per 3: June 3rd
Per 4: June 3rd
Per 8: June 3rd

Presentation Order


5/28

posted May 28, 2015, 11:42 AM by Mike Costello   [ updated May 28, 2015, 1:45 PM ]

-Check after 20 min

Due Today
Create Folder: "Education Plan & Profile"
Education Plan (Last Class) Answer in complete sentences!

Tools to help:
List of Clubs in your Planner

Turn in:

Blog:

Read the article below...
After reading it, come up with 5 "test questions" as if you were the teacher
    -And answer them!


You Asked: Are My Devices Messing With My Brain?

May 13, 2015
    
You Asked: Are All My Devices Messing With My Brain?Illustration by Peter Oumanski for TIME

Yes—and you're probably suffering from phantom text syndrome, too.

First it was radio. Then it was television. Now doomsayers are offering scary predictions about the consequences of smartphones and all the other digital devices to which we’ve all grown so attached. So why should you pay any attention to the warnings this time?

Apart from portability, the big difference between something like a traditional TV and your tablet is the social component, says Dr. David Strayer, a professor of cognition and neural science at the University of Utah. “Through Twitter or Facebook or email, someone in your social network is contacting you in some way all the time,” Strayer says.

“We’re inherently social organisms,” adds Dr. Paul Atchley, a cognitive psychologist at Kansas University. There’s almost nothing more compelling than social information, he says, which activates part of your brain’s reward system. Your noodle is also hardwired to respond to novel sights or sounds. (For most of human history, a sudden noise might have signaled the presence of a predator.) “So something like a buzz or beep or flashing light is tapping into that threat detection system,” he explains.

Combine that sudden beep with the implicit promise of new social info, and you have a near-perfect, un-ignorable stimulus that will pull your focus away from whatever task your brain is working on. And while you may think you can quickly check a text or email and pick up that task where you left off, you really can’t.

“Every time you switch your focus from one thing to another, there’s something called a switch-cost,” says Dr. Earl Miller, a professor of neuroscience at Massachusetts Institute of Technology. “Your brain stumbles a bit, and it requires time to get back to where it was before it was distracted.”

While this isn’t a big deal if you’re doing something simple and rote—making an omelet, say, or folding clothes—it can be a very big deal if your brain is trying to sort out a complex problem, Miller says.

One recent study found it can take your brain 15 to 25 minutes to get back to where it was after stopping to check an email. And Miller’s own research shows you don’t get better at this sort of multitasking with practice. In fact, people who judged themselves to be expert digital multitaskers tended to be pretty bad at it, he says.

“You’re not able to think as deeply on something when you’re being distracted every few minutes,” Miller adds. “And thinking deeply is where real insights come from.”

There seems to be an easy solution to this: When you’re working on something complicated, switch off your phone or email.

That could work for some people. But there’s evidence that as your brain becomes accustomed to checking a device every few minutes, it will struggle to stay on task even at those times when it’s not interrupted by digital alerts. “There’s something called ‘phantom text syndrome,’ ” Atchley says. “You think you hear a text or alert, but there isn’t one.”

 
 
 

While phantom texts can afflict adults, Atchley says this phenomenon is pretty much universal among people under the age of 20—many of whom wouldn’t recognize a world that doesn’t include smartphones. Even if you don’t hear phantom alerts, you may still find yourself reflexively wanting to check your device every few minutes for updates, which disrupts your concentration regardless of whether you ignore that impulse.

Your ability to focus aside, a 2014 study appearing in the journal PLOS One found that people who spend a lot of time “media multitasking”—or juggling lots of different websites, apps, programs or other digital stimuli—tend to have less grey matter in a part of their brain involved with thought and emotion control. These same structural changes are associated with obsessive-compulsive disorder, depression, and anxiety disorders, says that study’s first author, Kepkee Loh, who conducted his research at University College London.

Atchley says more research suggests lots of device use bombards your brain’s prefrontal cortex, which plays a big role in willpower and decision-making. “The prefrontal cortex prevents us from doing stupid things, whether it’s eating junk food or texting while driving,” he explains.

He says this part of the human brain isn’t “fully wired” until your early 20s—another issue that has him worried about how a lot of device use may be affecting children and adolescents.

So what’s the antidote? Spending time in nature may counteract the focus-draining effects of too much tech time, shows research Atchley and Strayer published in 2012. Meditation may also offer focus-strengthening benefits.

Strayer says putting your phone on silent and setting your email only to deliver new messages every 30 minutes are also ways to use your devices strategically and “not be a slave to them,” he adds.

Of course, there are plenty of benefits associated with the latest and greatest technologies. Ease and convenience of staying in touch with friends is a big one. But many open questions remain when it comes to the true cost of our digital distractions.

“Imagine Einstein trying to think about mathematics at a time when part of his brain was wondering what was going on with Twitter,” Atchley says. “People make incredible breakthroughs when they’re concentrating very hard on a specific task, and I wonder if our devices are taking away our ability to do that.”

May 27th

posted May 27, 2015, 7:29 AM by Mike Costello   [ updated May 27, 2015, 9:42 AM ]

5 min Study time!

-Shmoop Stuff


Go to www.schoology.com
-Login 

User Name= FirstLastdd
Password= ID #

Take the Netiquette Post-test!

If you don't click on "Sign Up"
-Student
-Access Code:
    Per 1- 8g3t2-d8tbk
    Per 3- 3fgw7-jxs2q
    Per 4- hzj22-kcj6k
    Per 8- hgmt3-wrg2f

Due Today
Create Folder: "Education Plan & Profile"
Education Plan (Last Class) Answer in complete sentences!

Tools to help:
List of Clubs in your Planner

Turn in:

Check www.typingweb.com

May 22nd-26th

posted May 22, 2015, 7:32 AM by Mike Costello   [ updated May 26, 2015, 1:39 PM ]

Typing Web -20 min

FINAL Introduction!!!

Tools to help:
List of Clubs in your Planner

Dear Students,
This is the remaining schedule for the few days that we have left in class, it will be very important that you get your work done in class! We will only have 2 class days to work on our final, and then we will be presenting them as a class. I will discuss more with you later. 

Mr. Costello

Remaining Schedule:
5/21B-Post Test, Intro Education Profile/Plan
5/22A-Intro Final (Workday) Per 3/4 Post Test
5/26B
5/27A-Education Profile/Plan Workday (due)
5/28B
5/29A-Final Workday
6/01B
6/02A-Per 1 Final Presentation (day 1)/Workday 3/4/8
6/03B
6/04A-Per 1 (day 2)/3/4/8 (day1) Final Presentation
6/05B
6/08A-Per 3/4/8 (day 2) Final Presentation
6/09B

May 20-21st

posted May 20, 2015, 7:47 AM by Mike Costello   [ updated May 21, 2015, 12:02 PM ]

Typing Web -20 min

5 min Study time!

-Shmoop Stuff


Go to www.schoology.com
-Login 

User Name= FirstLastdd
Password= ID #

Take the Netiquette Post-test!

If you don't click on "Sign Up"
-Student
-Access Code:
    Per 1- 8g3t2-d8tbk
    Per 3- 3fgw7-jxs2q
    Per 4- hzj22-kcj6k
    Per 8- hgmt3-wrg2f

Intro
Create Folder: "Education Plan & Profile"
Education Profile (next class)
Education Plan (today) Answer in complete sentences!

Tools to help:
List of Clubs in your Planner


Q & A time with Officer Morinville or Culp
-Online Bullying
-Internet Safety (beware creepers)
-Predators
-Questions
    -How'd you become a police officer?
    -What do you think about _______?
    -What's your favorite thing about being a police officer?

May 18th-19th

posted May 15, 2015, 2:35 PM by Mike Costello   [ updated May 18, 2015, 8:30 AM ]

New online Smarter Balanced tests: Oregon schools more worried about students' typing skills than Internet connections, computer capacity

READ THE COMMENTS TOO!!! (NEAR THE BOTTOM)

Tell me in 4-5 sentences why the state is concerned about your typing skills, use facts, statistics from the article to help you! 
ex: "At least half of districts said their technology is up to giving every student in grades three through eight plus grade 11 a digitally advanced test in math and in reading and writing"



Typing web - 20 min
Username: Last First dd 
Password: Student ID#



SHMOOP DAY 6

Turn in "Shmoop Day 6" HERE

May 14th-15th

posted May 14, 2015, 7:40 AM by Mike Costello   [ updated May 14, 2015, 12:08 PM ]

Typing web - 20 min
Username: Last First dd
Password: Student ID#

SHMOOP #6 & #6.5 – Online Research and Keyword Search Techniques Activity: Research Basics & Keywords

Instructions for You – 75 Mins

Objective: Looking for info today ≠ your granny’s library card catalog. The first, last, and oftentimes only line of defense that students use to do research (at least in high school and beyond) is the Internet. Along with a host of delicious morsels of 411 goodies, come the challenges of knowing how to find the information that a student actually needs.

In this activity, students will explore and use different search engines. Students answer questions about the challenges of conducting online research, and learn how to narrow searches and find useful intel on the Web and specific websites.

Materials Needed: 

Step 1 (5-10 mins):  How many of you use the Internet to find information, and what kind of information it is.

It’s a big bad 411-filled world out there – and it’s got your number. Let’s see if you have its addy. How many of you have done research online before? What search sites did you use? [Possible answers: Google, Yahoo, Bing] What info were you looking for? Research sounds pretty academic and yawny, but it can also be fun. Whenever you check on a movie time, for example, you’re doing research. Yelping a new restaurant? Research!

As a class, brainstorm what kinds of questions they might use the Internet to answer. Remind students that research doesn’t just mean school or academics. Here are some possible answers:

  • Movie times (Fandango, anyone?)

  • Driving directions (Google maps and MapQuest come to mind here)

  • Quality of restaurants (Yelp!)

  • Movie and video game reviews (Rotten Tomatoes, IGN)

  • Cell phone plans

  • Recipes

  • Used iPads for sale (eBay, Craigslist)

  • What movie Taylor Lautner will be in next (IMDb)

  • Coupons and deals (Groupon, LivingSocial)

Step 2 (15 mins): Pass out copies of the "Google Search Madness" handout.  Independently search for the answers to the questions on the handout.

You will have 10 minutes to find the answers.  When you have found all of the answers, raise your hand. Winners will earn 10 Bonus Points.  Note:  Do Not use Wikipedia.org

Step 3 (3 mins):  As a class we will watch the "Searching the Web" video, which will provide some useful tips on keywords and phrases.

Step 4 (3-5 mins):  As a class we will read through the four tips on the "Google Search Pro Tips" handout, which gives specific tips on improving the keywords and phrases you enter into the Google search engine.  Does anyone have any other tips to add.

Step 5 (10-15 mins):  Students go to the second page of the handout, which lists search scenarios and requires them to come up with good search terms.  You'll all be competing to see who comes up with the best search results (the keywords/phrases that offer the fewest total results on Google).

Students read the scenarios, then come up with a few search terms they think are good, based on the tips they've learned.  Be sure to enter your search terms into Google, recording the total number of results for each keyword/phrase (probably will be in the thousands, if not millions) and the number of websites that look relevant on the first page of their Google results.

You will have 10 minutes to work on this then we will share your best search term and results for each of the four scenarios. The student with the lowest number of search results wins. (Use your judgment to ensure that the keyword/phrase will actually offer good results.)  Winners will earn 10 Bonus Points

Step 6 (5 mins):  Discussion with students about using keywords:

  1. How did you find your best search results?

  2. Which search techniques were most useful? Which is your new favorite technique?

  3. Was it hard to come up with good options for search terms?

  4. What kinds of questions do you think are the hardest to answer using a search engine?

Step 7 (4 minutes) – OPTIONAL: At this point, some of your students might be pretty curious about how search engines work. Direct them to watch "How Search Works," a video created by Google. This video isn't only interesting, but also provides some useful info on how Google uses keywords to provide a list of results.

SHMOOP #8.5 – Using and Citing Online Sources Activity: In Plain Cite: How To Credit Others' Work

Instructions for You – 30 Mins

Objective: Using someone else's ideas without giving them proper props is a total no-no. We'll be real about some of the finer points of plagiarism and how to avoid it in some later activities, but for now let's assume that no one here will EVER EVER EVER plagiarize and focus on the positive: how to give someone their props, a.k.a. cite them.

Students will understand why citing others' work and ideas is so crucial to doing school and life right, and learn how to write some simple bibliographical citations in MLA and Chicago formats. Students answer critical questions, participate in classroom discussion, and compete for who can do the best and fastest citations.

Materials Needed: 

  • Computer with Internet access

Step 1 (5-10 mins):  As  a class we will read the following article.  Open the link to the KY Virtual Library article "Why Cite Information Sources."  This will provide an overview on why it's important to credit others' work, and what a citation is. After reading the article, begin a discussion about citing work:

  1. Why is it important to cite your information sources?

  2. Have you ever read some "facts," maybe online, that didn't provide sources? Did you wonder where they got their information from?

  3. When might you want to look into the sources for an article you've read?

  4. Have you ever had to cite your sources in class before, maybe for a research paper?

Step 2 (2-5 mins):  Discussion/Explanation that there are three primary ways to cite information sources for humanities and social science materials:  MLA, Chicago, and APA.  It doesn't really matter what these names stand for, but what they're used for does matter. Run through the following information with the class:

  • MLA citation format is generally used for English class.

  • Chicago citation format is generally used for history.

  • APA citation format is generally used for psychology, and sometimes for other social sciences.  (This will likely be the format you will use at DDHS except for your English classes)

Step 3 (15 mins):  Go to DDHS’ homepage – Go to Library and Media Center (red Quick Link box on right) – Go to David Douglas High School – Go to GALE, OSLIS, LearningExpress Library & Citation Maker (Online Library Resources on right side) – Open Cite My Sources – Open APA CITATION MAKER

Using Citation Maker, you will create five Citations for each of the following and then Save in Word – SAVE TO YOUR DESKTOP AS P#_First Last Name_Citation Maker:

  • On Course:  Strategies for Creating Success in College and in Life

  • One source from each of your four search terms on your Google Search Pro Tips Worksheet

    • The science of how eclipses work

    • Quote from The Princess Bride . . . Prepare to die

    • ‘90s toy – the plastic troll

    • Data on how many people lost their jobs in 2011

Standards Met

  • Common Core Standards: ELA 6-8th Grade Standards: Reading 1, 2; Reading for Informational Text 1, 2, 4, 7; Writing 2d, 3d, 5, 6, 8; Speaking and Listening 1bcd, 2

  • 21st Century Skills: Information, Media, and Technology Skills: Access and Evaluate Information, Use and Manage Information, Analyze Media; Life and Career Skills: Interact Effectively with Others, Work Effectively in Diverse Teams.


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