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Digital Literacy Sem 2 2019

DDSD Google Login
StudentVUE District URL: https://student.cascadetech.org/ddsd40/
How to turn in assignments...

If you ever get 1 point on an assignment, it is probably because you did not share it properly and I cannot view it

If you are turning in late work, you need to turn it in using the original link
then send me an email @ mike_costello@ddsd40.org

Example:
Mr. Costello,
I just wanted to let you know I turned in the __________ assignment late. I apologize for being a slacker, 
and not getting it done on time :)

link to document

Thanks,
Joe Student
Per #

-Extra Credit Opportunity:
    -Join a Team/Club/Activity
    -No athletics!
    -Get an Advisor/Coach signature that you participated!
    -Turn in to Mr. Costello




No LaTe WoRk AcCePteD AfTeR MaY 24tH

Last Finals Workday

posted Jun 11, 2019, 7:25 AM by Mike Costello   [ updated Jun 12, 2019, 1:25 PM ]

Day 3 Final Work
Instructions HERE
-Finish Intro + 5 subpages
(Extra Credit?)

Final Scoring

Spelling/Grammar/Font Size = 5 points

Intro Page = 5 points

-Picture

-Descriptive answers

3 Layouts = 5 points

-At least 3

5 Subpages = 20 points

-Answers thought out

-Includes “Evidence” where needed


Pictures/Headers are important!


Final: 35/230 points

Extra Credit Opportunity:
-Complete 2 extra subpages
-Chance to raise grade 4% (10 points)
-Needs to be EXCELLENT or will not count



June 5th-10th

posted Jun 5, 2019, 7:53 AM by Mike Costello   [ updated Jun 10, 2019, 7:53 AM ]

Day 2 Final Work
Instructions HERE
-Finish Intro + 3 subpages

Final Scoring

Spelling/Grammar/Font Size = 5 points

Intro Page = 5 points

-Picture

-Descriptive answers

3 Layouts = 5 points

-At least 3

5 Subpages = 20 points

-Answers thought out

-Includes “Evidence” where needed


Final: 35/230 points

Extra Credit Opportunity:
-Complete 2 extra subpages
-Chance to raise grade 4% (10 points)
-Needs to be EXCELLENT or will not count


June 3rd-4th

posted Jun 2, 2019, 8:58 PM by Mike Costello   [ updated Jun 12, 2019, 1:25 PM ]

Course Evaluation
-Anonymous


Turn in HS PLAN SPREADSHEET Here

Make sure document can be seen "Anyone at David Douglas"
-Share
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Turn in HS PLAN QUESTIONS Here

Make sure document can be seen "Anyone at David Douglas"
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May 30th-31st

posted May 30, 2019, 7:32 AM by Mike Costello   [ updated May 30, 2019, 10:47 AM ]

Typing Web - 20 min

-Advanced Lessons Due TODAY!!!

Final typing test

    -3 min


Finish CLA Day 2 Assignment
    -All 4 years of HS classes filled out (with prerequisites)
        -color code and gpa
    -Answer Questions in Step 4


CLA'S Day 2


  1. Fill out Google Sheet with classes that fit the occupations you have researched. Be careful to not mess up the formulas!!!

    1. Use the DD curriculum guide to find classes we offer to find HS classes we have that match or are very close

    2. Make sure you match up prerequisites needed

    3. Use CNTRL F / Window F to search curriculum guide FAST!

    4. Will have WS if you need a paper copy to visualize classes


  1. Graduation Requirements / Color Code Classes

    1. Find classes that fit your career interest but you still need to graduate

    2. You need 25 Credits to graduate.  

    3. You need a 2.0 to graduate HS.

    4. 4 English credits

    5. 3 Math credits

    6. 3 Social Studies Credits

    7. 3 Science Credit (Physics or Chem required or University)

    8. 1.5 Physical Education

    9. 1 Career Credit (Dig Lit / Pace or replacement)

    10. 2 Fine Art or two consecutive years of Language

    11. 1 Health (Freshman year)


  1. Fill out grades you have received/are expecting in future classes

    1. This will help give you an idea of what careers are realistic

      1. Look up average GPA / Average education for jobs.

    2. Most Universities require 3.0 or higher out of high school

      1. You can transfer from CC most of the time and be ok.

    3. Find out what type of grades are needed to raise your GPA

      1. You might need to take some classes are are easy

  2. Answer These questions in a Google Doc for your final. 3-5 Sent (CLA Questions)

    1. What are classes that I need to work harder in / Spend more time studying to make sure I can obtain the GPA required for my desired Job?  What are your current work habits and what can you change?


  1. What classes are most important for my desired Job/Field that I am interested in?  Does David Douglas offer these classes or will I need to find an after-school extracurricular club or class?

  1. What is going to be your largest obstacle preventing you from being successful moving forward?  Examples: Attendance, procrastination, lazy, quitting, attitude, family, etc...

  1. What is the importance of this assignment?  Why does Mr. Costello want you to know this information, like your GPA / Job information?




    Turn in HS PLAN SPREADSHEET Here

    Make sure document can be seen "Anyone at David Douglas"
    -Share
    -More-> "Anyone at David Douglas can view"

    Turn in HS PLAN QUESTIONS Here

    Make sure document can be seen "Anyone at David Douglas"
    -Share
    -More-> "Anyone at David Douglas can view"



    Intro Final
    Instructions HERE

    FINAL GRADE ESTIMATOR! (NOT 100% ACCURATE)

May 28-29th

posted May 28, 2019, 7:29 AM by Mike Costello   [ updated May 30, 2019, 7:29 AM ]

Typing Web - 20 min

-Advanced Lessons Due May 31st!!!

Final typing test Thursday/Friday


CLA'S Day 2


  1. Fill out Google Sheet with classes that fit the occupations you have researched. Be careful to not mess up the formulas!!!

    1. Use the DD curriculum guide to find classes we offer to find HS classes we have that match or are very close

    2. Make sure you match up prerequisites needed

    3. Use CNTRL F / Window F to search curriculum guide FAST!

    4. Will have WS if you need a paper copy to visualize classes


  1. Graduation Requirements / Color Code Classes

    1. Find classes that fit your career interest but you still need to graduate

    2. You need 25 Credits to graduate.  

    3. You need a 2.0 to graduate HS.

    4. 4 English credits

    5. 3 Math credits

    6. 3 Social Studies Credits

    7. 3 Science Credit (Physics or Chem required or University)

    8. 1.5 Physical Education

    9. 1 Career Credit (Dig Lit / Pace or replacement)

    10. 2 Fine Art or two consecutive years of Language

    11. 1 Health (Freshman year)


  1. Fill out grades you have received/are expecting in future classes

    1. This will help give you an idea of what careers are realistic

      1. Look up average GPA / Average education for jobs.

    2. Most Universities require 3.0 or higher out of high school

      1. You can transfer from CC most of the time and be ok.

    3. Find out what type of grades are needed to raise your GPA

      1. You might need to take some classes are are easy

  2. Answer These questions in a Google Doc for your final. 3-5 Sent (CLA Questions)

    1. What are classes that I need to work harder in / Spend more time studying to make sure I can obtain the GPA required for my desired Job?  What are your current work habits and what can you change?


  1. What classes are most important for my desired Job/Field that I am interested in?  Does David Douglas offer these classes or will I need to find an after-school extracurricular club or class?

  1. What is going to be your largest obstacle preventing you from being successful moving forward?  Examples: Attendance, procrastination, lazy, quitting, attitude, family, etc...

  1. What is the importance of this assignment?  Why does Mr. Costello want you to know this information, like your GPA / Job information?




    Turn in HS PLAN SPREADSHEET Here

    Make sure document can be seen "Anyone at David Douglas"
    -Share
    -More-> "Anyone at David Douglas can view"

    Turn in HS PLAN QUESTIONS Here

    Make sure document can be seen "Anyone at David Douglas"
    -Share
    -More-> "Anyone at David Douglas can view"

May 23rd-24th

posted May 23, 2019, 7:21 AM by Mike Costello   [ updated May 23, 2019, 11:14 AM ]

New Blog Post
Read Article
    -Only read "Explore your interests" Section
        -Summarize "Learn About Yourself", "Identify Possible Careers" and "Do Your Research"
            -3 main points (Full sentences)

Turn in any missing late work



-Open a new Google Presentation

-Title it “Career Learning Areas”

-Go to Oregon CIS

    -Login: ddouglas

    -Password: ddhs

-At least 6 Slides Long

-Size 18 font

-Bullet points (8 words or less)

-Max 1 image per slide


Slide 1 - Title Slide

-Title of assignment

-Name, Period, Date


Slide 2 - Career Learning Area Overview

-Hover over “Education” and select “Career Learning Areas”

-Pick a CLA that you are interested in

-Summarize the “Overview” in your own words


Slides 3 and 4 - Occupations

-Click on “Occupations” from your CLA page

-Pick 3-5 jobs that you are interested in

-Must pick at least one from each:

    -No College (On the job training)

    -Associate’s Degree or Postsecondary Certificate

    -Bachelor’s Degree+

-Include a quick description of each job (1-2 sentences)


Slides 5 and 6 - Helpful High School Courses

-Click on each job you select

-Go to “Helpful High School Courses” on the left side of the menu

-For each career pick a few courses that are helpful (4+)


We will be using these “Helpful High School Courses” in an assignment next class.

So be sure to list names and explanations of each.


Turn in CLA Presentation Here

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May 21st-22nd

posted May 21, 2019, 5:32 AM by Mike Costello   [ updated May 22, 2019, 1:50 PM by Mike Costello ]

New Blog Post - Going Phishing

1. What is Phishing? 3-5 Sent
2. What are 3 targets of Phishing (What are the creators looking to get?)
    a
     b
     c

3. What are two ways to avoid phishing scams
    a
     b

4. What are homograph attacks? 3-5 Sent



SHMOOP DAY 5 (LAST DAY!)

-OPEN A NEW GOOGLE DOC


Step 1 (15 mins):  "Website Evaluation True or False Quiz."  Take the quiz on their own and then “correct” your own quiz, as we discuss the answers as a whole class.


INSERT A TABLE 3 cells wide X 12 cells tall

 Statement     True/False? Explanation
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   


 

But let me ask you something. Do you guys hear any rumors going around school? Do you believe them all? How do you know whether to believe something that somebody tells you? [Possible answers: hear it from multiple trustworthy friends, see it first-hand, get evidence that it’s true, etc.]You have to approach the information you find on the Internet the same way that you should treat rumors in real life: don’t believe everything you read or hear.

 

 

Step 2 (10 mins): Review with students the guidelines outlined for detecting lies online. Hopefully, they will have gathered all of the following tips:

 

·         Copy & paste the following 6 items into your SHMOOP Doc

 

  1. Be a skeptic.
  2. Don’t be fooled by cool or professional websites. 
  3. Ask yourself what’s the point of view of the site. What are they trying to get me to believe? What opinions or ideas are missing? 
  4. Investigate the source. Find out who published the information. 
  5. Follow the "Rule of 3": compare three sources of information. 
  6. Be careful about using facts that you find without checking them out first.

 

 

Step 4 (20 mins): Give students the "Shady or Legit? Web Evaluation Form" handout and ask them to evaluate whether the listed websites seem to deserve an L (for legit) or S (for shady).

 

Now that we know a little bit about what to look for, let’s use this worksheet to evaluate whether some websites are valid and true or probably not.


Insert a table 6 Wide X 11 Tall

Answer the questions with more than a yes/no

 Website  Shady or Legit?Can you tell who wrote the site?
Are they a legit source of information?
Can info be found on other sites?
Does it answer all your questions?
Professional looking?
Formate raise concerns?
URL seem safe?
Biased? Do you see anything that makes you think the site isn't totally objective?
Does the website have an "agenda"?
uoregon.edu
 whitehouse.gov     
 eapoe.org     
 poemuseum.org     
 houseofusher.net     
http://pirlwww.lpl.arizona.edu/~jscotti/apollo.html     
www.ufos-aliens.co.uk/cosmicapollo.html     
 nasa.gov/mission_pages/apollo     
 timtfj.wordpress.com     
 blogs.scientificamerican.com/budding-scientist     

 

Step 5 (15 mins): As a class, discuss the websites and how the students determined whether they were shady or legitimate.


Which sites deserve the following awards:

  1. Sketchiest (Worst)
  2. Most Legit (Best)
  3. Sassiest (Bold)
  4. Pics Had It Goin’ On (Best Looking)
  5. Smells Fishy (Need to research more)



Turn in Shmoop Day 5 Here

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Me everyday...

posted May 17, 2019, 10:31 AM by Mike Costello


May 17-20th

posted May 17, 2019, 7:21 AM by Mike Costello   [ updated May 17, 2019, 10:12 AM ]

Typing Web - 20 min

-Advanced Lessons Due May 31st!!!


SHMOOP DAY 4
Internet Privacy and Security Activity: Keeping It Real (Secret): Creating Strong Passwords and Avoiding Tricks

Objective: Students have a sense that digital information is not private, but managing personal information on the worldwide wacky web is not nearly as totes obvi as students might think. In this activity, students get a crash course on all the basics (and a few not-so-basics) about keeping their private info under wraps. After all, friends don't let friends e-cruise confused. Students learn how to create strong account passwords, avoid malware, manage their browser history, and check for secure sites. Students will develop their own list of policies to stay safe and secure online.

Materials Needed: 

  • Computers with Internet access
  • Computer headphones for watching online videos (optional)

Step 1 (5 mins): Remind students that the first and most important gatekeepers to their personal information online are passwords. Students control their own passwords and so have the power to create a strong wall of protection around their personal information.

Students: Watch the "Passwords 101" video on YouTube and answer the following questions:

  1. What are some examples of bad passwords? Are any of your personal passwords weak like these?
  2. Why are these passwords unsafe? Why are they easy to hack? 
  3. Based on this video, do you think any of your personal passwords are strong?

Step 2 (5 mins): After watching the video, CLASS DISCUSSION of what NOT to do when creating a password.

DON’TS

-

-

-

Now move on to brainstorming the characteristics of good passwords. Possible answers:

DO'S

 

 

 


Step 3 (5 mins): Discuss ways to protect their passwords from others. Possible answers:

  • Don't ever write down your password.
  • Never ever text or email your password, since then anyone who breaks into your phone or laptop can steal your password.
  • Don't tell anyone your password. 
  • Variety is the spice of life: don't use the same password for everything
  • Don't let public computers remember your passwords or usernames. (We're not suggesting your local librarian is an identity thief, but you have to be careful.)

Step 4 (5 mins): Students, use the criteria you came up with for good and bad passwords to create a list of 5-10 bad (or weak) passwords, ones that are easy to guess. Students do this activity in your own GoogleDoc, you can work alone, or in partners. Then each student comes up with one good password that he/she keeps private. 

BAD

1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

GOOD

1. 

Sample tip: One great idea for creating a really hard-to-guess password is to use the first letters from the words of a line from your favorite song. For example, take Lady Gaga's "Born This Way." The line "I'm beautiful in my way" would give you "IBIMW" and then you can combine that with other numbers, letters, and symbols. Just make sure you can remember your own password – and that you're not humming your favorite song at your desk all day. Hummers, beware. Now you try using this to create a good password: what would your secret tune be?

YouTube Video

Step 5 (5 mins): Time for the moment of truth. Direct students to the Password Meter site to test how tough their passwords are. If their passwords are weak, they should keep trying new possibilities until they settle on a good one.

Remind students to not share the wealth of their private info, because anyone can use it to steal from them, impersonate them, or even worse. Dun dun dun. And no, we're not being drama queens here.

How Long Will It Take To Hack My Password?

How Big Is Your Password?

How Strong Is Your Password?

Check HERE (Change the year born-2020)


Have I been Pwned?


Step 6 (5 mins): Remind students that they should always sign out and/or log off when they leave a computer or email program.

Why?


Step 7 (5 mins)Explain to students that even if they're super careful with their passwords, there are always viruses lurking in the background that can compromise their online security.

Sample explanation: Viruses and other evil computer problems are called by a million dollar word: malware. Anyone have any idea what mal means? [Students may know that "mal" means bad in Spanish and a lot of other languages too.] That's right, viruses are bad news. If they sneak into your computer, they use and abuse your files and information. They can delete your diary entries and even software, which then costs money to replace. They can also steal all that personal information that you've worked so hard to keep private.

Watch: Viruses, Worms and Trojans…Oh my! an animated video on YouTube that explains how these cyber bad guys work. Afterwards, answer the following questions:

  1. What is malware, and what can malware be used to do? 
  2. How do Trojans trick users into downloading them? Do you think you've ever come across a Trojan?
  3. What's the scariest thing you learned about malware from this video?


Step 8 (5-10 mins): Class discussion about some ways to avoid malware.

1. Explain what hashes are and why they are used (2-4 Sent)

2. How does salt protect your Hash? What would happen if websites did not use salt? (2-4 Sent)

YouTube Video


2018 Most Common Passwords

If you find that your passwords aren’t so unlike the ones included in this year’s list, wyd??? Change your passwords. Here’s the full, eighth annual list:

1. 123456 (Unchanged)

2. password (Unchanged)

3. 123456789 (Up 3)

4. 12345678 (Down 1)

5. 12345 (Unchanged)

6. 111111 (New)

7. 1234567 (Up 1)

8. sunshine (New)

9. qwerty (Down 5)

10. iloveyou (Unchanged)

11. princess (New)

12. admin (Down 1)

13. welcome (Down 1)

14. 666666 (New)

15. abc123 (Unchanged)

16. football (Down 7)

17. 123123 (Unchanged)

18. monkey (Down 5)

19. 654321 (New)

20. !@#$%^&* (New)

21. charlie (New)

22. aa123456 (New)

23. donald (New)

24. password1 (New)

25. qwerty123 (New)


Step 9 (15-20 mins): Students show off what they've learned by creating a Top 10 (or more) list of their own policies for staying safe and secure online. Students should use their own words for this and yes, Internet slang and abbreves are more than okay.

Step 10 (Costello)

Insert an Image as a Drawing and create your own

“Safe Password Meme


Standards Met

  • Common Core Standards: ELA 6-8th Grade Standards: Reading 1; Reading for Informational Text 1, 4; Writing 2d, 3d, 8; Speaking and Listening 1bcd, 2.
  • 21st Century Skills: Information, Media, and Technology Skills: Access and Evaluate Information, Use and Manage Information, Apply Technology Effectively; Life and Career Skills: Interact Effectively with Others, Work Effectively in Diverse Teams.

Turn in Shmoop Day 4 Here

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May 15-16th

posted May 15, 2019, 7:24 AM by Mike Costello   [ updated May 16, 2019, 9:35 AM ]

New Blog "Not Secure"

1. What does it mean when a website is "Not Secure" 2-4 sent
2. What is the benefit of knowing you are on a secure website 1-2 Sent 
3. Should you never visit a Not Secure website? 2-4 sent
4. What could be at risk if you are entering information to unsecured websites 2-4 Sent
5. What Privacy issues do Not Secure have when you are searching the web? 2-4 Sent    



SHMOOP Day Three: Domains

1. What do the following Domains stand for? (Look them up on google) 
        .com =
        .net =
        .org =
        .gov =
        .edu =
        .mil =
        .uk =
        .us =


2.  Rank the domains according to the credibility (What ones are are more controlled / not for $)
     


3.  If you are writing a research paper or trying to convince someone with data/facts what types of websites would have more credibility and explain? why?  

Can websites with different domains or ones that are low on your list still be good to use and why?  
(3-5 Sent)

Google this "domain credibility"

4. Some of the domains could lose credibility in a variety of ways...  
How could a .gov/org lose credibility over time? (3-5 Sent)  (
Think about why you would stop using a website / If you thought some of the writers/contributors were biased or incorrect) 

Google this "domain credibility"


5. Find websites that use each domain. (Use google any copy and paste the Link) Ex www.google.com
        .com
        .net
        .org
        .gov
        .edu
        .mil
        .uk
        .us


Turn in Shmoop Day 3 Here
Make sure document can be seen "Anyone at David Douglas"
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